How to Write Your Remote Job Resume

How to Write Your Remote Job Resume

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1. Create a master resume template

The goal of a resume is to land a job interview, and the best way to do that is to tailor each resume to show why you're a good fit for the position and company. But creating a resume from scratch is time-consuming. That's why we recommend creating a master resume. A master resume is a document that lists all of your skills 

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1. Create a master resume template

and experience in one place so you can choose the relevant experience to tailor your resume for each position you apply for. Don't worry about the length of your master resume. Add all your education, online courses, awards and recognition, and work experience.

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2. Showcase your previous remote work experience and skills

Now that you've built out your master resume, it's time to add remote skills that show why you're a good fit for a remote work environment. Remember, remote work requires a specific set of skills that you need to highlight. An obvious place to do this is in the skills section of your resume. For example, working successfully in remote teams 

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2. Showcase your previous remote work experience and skills

requires you to be comfortable with asynchronous communication and remote collaboration. Updating the skills section is the obvious place, but don't forget to sprinkle it throughout your work experience section too. If you already have remote experience, make it clear.

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3. Create three versions of your resume

Now that you've built out your master resume template, you'll want to create three different resume templates that target: 1. Similar roles: This resume will be used as a base when applying for jobs that are similar to your current or previous roles. 2. Bridge roles: Bridge roles are jobs that are different from your previous roles but allow you 

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3. Create three versions of your resume

to learn new skills that'll help you land an ideal role in the future. 3. Ideal roles: This resume will be used when you're applying for your ideal role which could be a jump in seniority, in a different field, or requires skills you don't have yet.

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4. Read the job posting carefully and use it to tailor your resume

The job description has everything you need to create a tailored resume that is perfect for the role. Hiring managers invest a lot of time writing these descriptions to attract the right candidates.  Leverage the work they've done to tailor your resume to show that you're exactly what they're looking for. Look at the job title. Is it a similar, bridge, or ideal role? 

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4. Read the job posting carefully and use it to tailor your resume

Choose one of your three resumes as the base. Now you'll want to read the job ad and look at the skills and keywords they use.  Remote jobs get a ton of applicants, so most remote companies use applicant tracking systems (ATS) to automatically filter out resumes that don't match the job description. If your resume 

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4. Read the job posting carefully and use it to tailor your resume

uses the same language, it'll be pushed to the top and reviewed by the hiring manager.

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5. Remove irrelevant or unnecessary information

You now have a tailored resume that matches the job description and company. Now it's time to remove irrelevant or unnecessary information. While it can be tempting to list out every achievement and your entire working history, your resume needs to be short. A good rule of thumb is one or at most two pages. Every word, bullet point, and

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5. Remove irrelevant or unnecessary information

statement should contribute. Only include work experience, education, and other information that is relevant to the job you're applying for. If you're applying for a remote product manager job, you probably don't need to talk about your customer service experience, unless you're using it to bolster your product experience.

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6. Make it obvious you're looking for a remote job

Yes, it's increasingly common for job listings to show that they're open to remote but some companies still list a location and note that remote work is supported.  In other situations, companies may not mention remote work at all but are still open to it if you're an excellent candidate. Make it clear you're looking for a remote role.

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6. Make it obvious you're looking for a remote job

Resumes typically include the city and state you live in to give the potential employer context about whether they'll need to fly you in for an interview or offer you a relocation stipend. This is obviously not important to a prospective employer if you'll be working from home.

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7. Seal the deal with a great cover letter

A resume is only one part of a good application. Finding a remote job and getting hired typically means beating out a large pool of candidates, particularly if a remote position is open to job seekers worldwide. If you want to stand out, write a cover letter. Your cover letter is also a great place to re-emphasize your 

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7. Seal the deal with a great cover letter

WFH-relevant experience. Cover letters add color that can be missing from a resume and allow you to dive deeper into your background, skills, and expertise.  It can also help the hiring manager understand why you're applying for the specific job at their company, and most importantly why they should interview you over other candidates.

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8. Research the company before your interview

Now that you've got a tailored resume and cover letter, there's a high chance you'll land an interview. Invest time into researching the company. It's essential that you research the company before applying for the job. The good news is this doesn't take a whole lot of effort. Start with the company's website and familiarize yourself with its products and mission. 

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8. Research the company before your interview

From there, you can listen to or watch interviews with the CEO or members of the leadership team.  You can also use our remote company profiles to learn about thousands of companies, their tech stacks, and company cultures.

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