How to Save + Email Your Resume to an Employer: 10 Crucial Tips

How to Save + Email Your Resume to an Employer: 10 Crucial Tips

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1. Keep the File Format Consistent Across Items—and Always Save as a Pdf

PDFs are pretty universal. It's actually even in the name. PDF stands for portable document format. Portable: meaning it works on pretty much every operating system, mobile device, and tablet.  This guarantees that any pretty fonts or formats you've used will look the same to your reader as they do to you. We love the PDF. We live 

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1. Keep the File Format Consistent Across Items—and Always Save as a Pdf

for the PDF. Always save as a PDF—unless you're instructed otherwise.

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2. Include (at Least) Your Last Name in the Document Name

Actually, we recommend you include your first name as well. This is especially true if you have a pretty common surname. Recruiters could have multiple job applications under the same name.  Additionally, we recommend that you separate each word with a dash to make it easy to read. – Firstname-Lastname-Resume.pdf 

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2. Include (at Least) Your Last Name in the Document Name

(i.e., Jane-Doe-Resume.pdf) – Firstname-Lastname-Cover-Letter.pdf (i.e., Jane-Doe-Cover-Letter.pdf) – Firstname-Lastname-References.pdf (i.e., Jane-Doe-References.pdf)

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3. Consider Including the Job Title as Well

If you never considered the file name to be that important when applying for a job, you might be laughing at this advice. However, you want your resume, cover letter, and other hiring documents to be as searchable as humanly possible. Put yourself back in a hiring manager or recruiter's shoes. They are likely hiring for a 

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3. Consider Including the Job Title as Well

variety of roles. In this case, we'd recommend throwing the job title in your file name, as well. – Firstname-Lastname-Resume-Role.pdf (i.e. Jane-Doe-Resume-Technical-Assistant.pdf) – Firstname-Lastname-Cover-Letter-Role.pdf (i.e. Jane-Doe-Cover-Letter-Technical-Assistant.pdf)

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3. Consider Including the Job Title as Well

– Firstname-Lastname-References-Role.pdf (i.e. Jane-Doe-References-Technical-Assistant.pdf) That's kind of it, but sometimes it's the simple things that make all the difference. By keeping your formatting consistent, you accomplish a couple of key things. You start drumming your name into the recruiter or interviewer's brain long 

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3. Consider Including the Job Title as Well

before they've contacted you for an interview (some people say it takes seeing your name six times for someone to remember it, like learning a new word. Consider your resume file and cover letter #1 and #2). And by including your name and the job role on your files, you save the receiver the added step of re-saving your resume. They'll appreciate it.

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4. Follow the Directions Listed in the Job Description

Most companies have a preference on how they would like to receive resumes, cover letters, and job applications. There's a good chance that the job posting will include instructions on how to submit. Carefully read (and re-read) the job posting. Follow the instructions outlined by the employer. Many hiring managers who receive a high 

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4. Follow the Directions Listed in the Job Description

volume of resumes may automatically eliminate job applicants who do not submit correctly. By following the directions listed in the job description, you are not only ensuring that your resume is seen, but you are also showing your keen attention to detail.

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5. Send from a Professional Email Address

This tip is straightforward but crucial. Triple check that the email address you are sending your email from is an acceptable professional email. Nothing is worse than sending your resume and realizing that you've sent it from "SarahsJunkMailBurnerAccount@hotmail.com." Make sure that the email you use is an email that you check 

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5. Send from a Professional Email Address

regularly and will always be accessible. For example, if you are graduating or have recently graduated, it's probably not a good idea to send an email from your .edu account in case you lose access.  Likewise, it's probably not the best idea to send a job application and resume from your current work email. This is not a good look for your 

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5. Send from a Professional Email Address

current employer and you also may lose access to that email at some point.

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6. Use a Clear Subject Line

When it comes to writing a subject line, the clearer, the better. We recommend a combination of your name and the job title for which you are applying. Here are some suggestions: –FirstName LastName Resume – FirstName LastName Cover Letter –FirstName LastName JobTitle – JobTitle - FirstName LastName

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6. Use a Clear Subject Line

Also, referring back to our first tip, the job posting may specify what subject line to use. Always defer to that subject line.

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7. Keep It Simple

As we've mentioned before, the recruiter or hiring manager probably has a flood of resumes and job applications in their inbox. In order to make it easier on the recipient of your resume, keep your email simple.  The text in the email body should be short and sweet. All of your work experience will be detailed in 

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7. Keep It Simple

your attached resume and cover letter. In terms of formatting, stick with default fonts. No need to change font colors, include emojis, or incorporate any flashy signatures. Anything that will slow the load time of your email is a no-go.

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8. Include a Signature with Contact Information

Speaking of signatures, make sure you have an updated professional signature that includes up-to-date contact information.  We recommend including your phone number, pronouns, website, a link to your LinkedIn profile, or any other professional social media handles if they are relevant.

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9. Always Proofread + Make Sure You Attached Your Resume

One of the most important things you can do before hitting the send button is to proofread your email for any typos or grammar mistakes. An email riddled with typos doesn't give off a great first impression to a potential employer. On that note, make sure that you have correctly spelled the hiring manager's name or that you are directing your 

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9. Always Proofread + Make Sure You Attached Your Resume

email to the correct person. After you've read over your email, double-check to make sure you have all of the correct attachments.

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10. Pro Tip: Send a Test Email Message

If you're still a bit nervous to send the email, we recommend sending a test email.  Try sending your resume to a friend to make sure it isn't hitting their spam email. Your friend can also serve as a second proofreader.

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