How to Create a Resume Header

How to Create a Resume Header

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What Goes On a Resume Header?

First, your resume header should include your: Full name. Job/Professional title. (Optional) Resume Summary or Objective Location. Phone number. Email address.

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What Goes On a Resume Header?

Full Name Your name is the first thing that you write in your resume header. Make sure to use the same name you use across all online profiles (that you want the hiring manager to know about).  For example, if you use “Jonathan” in your LinkedIn profile, don’t use Jon on your resume. The standard practice is: First Name, Last Name.

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What Goes On a Resume Header?

Job Title This one is pretty obvious. What title does the job ad say Mention that below your name, word-for-word. Do NOT use fancy buzzword job names. “Code Ninja, Marketing Samurai, Design Guru,” and the like. Sure, these sound cool, but no one actually knows what they mean.

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What Goes On a Resume Header?

Optional) Resume Summary or Objective Within your resume header, you can also include either a resume summary or an objective. These optional sections are there for the hiring manager to get a general idea of who you are, and why you’re the best person for the job. If they see that you’re relevant in a few words, they’ll want to continue reading.

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What Goes On a Resume Header?

So, if you decide to include them, here’s the difference between the two: – Resume Summary - Sums up your previous work experience and explains how it can benefit the company you want to work for. – Resume Objective - Describes your professional goals for the job you’re applying for. Unlike the resume summary, you don’t include work experience here, 

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What Goes On a Resume Header?

so it’s perfect for a no experience resume, or a career change resume.

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What Goes On a Resume Header?

Location The main thing the hiring manager wants to know here is if you’re in their area, or if they’ll have to sponsor your relocation. Hiring managers typically prefer people near their company. But if you really want to make it clear you’re willing to move, you can mention that you’re open to relocation. To keep things 

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What Goes On a Resume Header?

simple, you should only mention your country, and city (in that order). What you DON’T have to do, though, is to list your exact address. The recruiter does not care where you live.

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What Goes On a Resume Header?

Phone Number A phone number still remains the most common way for hiring managers to set up interviews. When listing your number, make sure you: – List the one you use the most. – Have a decent voice mail message (And not: “heeey, Kyle here, if you’re hearing this, I’m probably drunk or something, haha”).

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What Goes On a Resume Header?

– Include your country code, if applying outside your country. – Do NOT include your work number.

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What Goes On a Resume Header?

Email Address Right after your phone number, email is the #2 most common way for hiring managers to reach you. The #1 tip here is that your email should always be professional and easy-to-read. The standard email format is [FirstName][LastName]@gmail.com. And if that’s taken, using a first or last initial is okay.

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How to Make Your Resume Header Stand Out

Website If you have an online portfolio or a personal website that’s relevant to your job - feel free to include it in your header. Make sure it’s up to date and doesn’t have anything too personal that could get you in trouble with the HR.  If your job deals with online work (marketing, IT, design, etc.), your site can be a great way to show off your achievements.

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How to Make Your Resume Header Stand Out

LinkedIn Most (if not all) recruiters are going to be on LinkedIn. By adding your LinkedIn URL to your resume, the hiring manager can learn more about your professional qualifications. They can also see if you have some mutual connections in the company (who could end up recommending you!).

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How to Make Your Resume Header Stand Out

Just make sure your LinkedIn URL looks professional. By default, LinkedIn usually adds some random numbers to your profile when you first join. Make sure you personalize your LinkedIn URL by editing it in your profile settings.

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How to Make Your Resume Header Stand Out

Twitter You should only include your Twitter profile if you have a professional profile, and it’s relevant to your position. In very specific cases (e.g. marketing and journalism positions), your profile can help you come across as an expert on the subject, especially if you have a decent amount of followers. Otherwise, if you 

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How to Make Your Resume Header Stand Out

use Twitter to express personal opinions that don’t have anything to do with your job - it’s best to keep it off.

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How to Make Your Resume Header Stand Out

Behance Like with Twitter, relevance is key here. Applying for a design position and have your portfolio on Behance? Go for it! But if you’re applying for a finance role, the hiring manager will be very confused as to why you included it.

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How to Make Your Resume Header Stand Out

Quora Have a lot of followers and upvotes within your specific field? You can then go ahead and include your Quora profile. This can convince the HR manager you’re really the go-to expert on your topic.

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How to Make Your Resume Header Stand Out

GitHub This is only for developers, coders, and computer scientists. If that sounds like you and you have completed a lot of coding projects, feel free to link your GitHub profile in your resume.

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How to Make Your Resume Header Stand Out

Anything Else Got a YouTube channel? A personal blog? Something else? Use your discretion to decide if it’s relevant to your job position. Just make sure you don’t have anything too personal on there!

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