How to Answer “Tell Me About Yourself” During an Interview

How to Answer “Tell Me About Yourself” During an Interview

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Be confident

Before you even get the chance to figure out how to answer ”Tell me about yourself,” the interviewer needs to sense you're confident.  The same report showed that interviewers made the determination not to hire a candidate within the first 90 seconds based on factors like bad posture (33 percent), a weak handshake (26 percent), 

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Be confident

and overall confidence (38 percent). Your goal is to answer with confidence, without being cocky, so you'll hold the attention of the interviewer for the next 38 and a half minutes of the interview.

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Be honest and be yourself

The most important thing in an interview is to be yourself, regardless of what you're asked.  Trying to give answers you think the interviewer wants to hear instead of what you truly think or who you really are will get you in trouble down the road. Job and cultural fit are essential to success in any position, so it's better to know 

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Be honest and be yourself

during the interview if you're not thrilled with the company's culture or if you and your potential manager's personalities clash.

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Focus on work-related accomplishments

The meat of your response in speaking about yourself should focus on your work-related accomplishments, education, training, and experience. Sharing some of your professional goals is also fair game.

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Give a little personal history

It can be good to give a little personal history or insights into who you are when determining how to answer “Tell me about yourself, as long as you do it right.  Sharing what inspired you to make the career choice you made is OK, for example. Something like "I grew up in a one-stoplight town in the middle of nowhere and 

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Give a little personal history

decided to go to West Virginia University because it was close to home and a good option for me" or "I love to play golf in my spare time" are acceptable. This is especially true if you've done your research and know that the interviewer has similar interests and can relate — a bonus for you! If you are new to the workforce, you may not have a choice

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Give a little personal history

but to use some scenarios that are more personal in nature, because you may not have many work stories or experiences to pull from.  When I was interviewing for an internship in graduate school, I remember being asked something along the lines of "What's one of the most difficult scenarios or challenges you've dealt with to date?" My 

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Give a little personal history

answer? Marriage. It was the most honest answer I could give, and I explained why. Even though I did have work experience, marriage was still the first thing that came to mind. I was able to make the answer work-related by sharing that marriage requires communication, compromise, teamwork, understanding, and more, all of which are 

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Give a little personal history

requirements for success in the workplace. I received and accepted the offer and was later offered a full-time position. As you can see from this example, showing that it's OK to be yourself and share personal details if your intuition or gut guides you to do so, especially if you can find a way to relate it to the position for which you're interviewing.

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Don't give too many personal details

Though it's OK to share some personal details about yourself, it's also important that you use good judgment and proceed with caution in your ”Tell me about yourself” answer.  In most scenarios, you'll want to steer clear of discussing sensitive topics like family, religious beliefs, and politics. These tend to raise red flags or stir up heated debates that

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Don't give too many personal details

are best to avoid. Whether we like it or not, people have biases, and you don't want to be judged or lose a position because someone is concerned about your "personal" affairs or beliefs.

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Do your research

For any interview, you want to do your homework about the company. You should do the same research on those who will be interviewing you if you can.  If you have someone inside the company you can speak with, consider asking them some questions — this will give you some insight into what you and the interviewer might have in 

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Do your research

common that you could share about yourself in the interview. It could also give you an idea about the personality of the interviewer, so you can know if the interview will be "all business" or more relaxed and casual.

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Consider what the interviewer wants to know

Attempt to think of this question from the interviewer's point of view to help you craft a response. Interviewers are primarily listening to see if you have the experience to do the job, have the ability to learn, and would be a good fit for the work group and organization. This is why focusing on work-related accomplishments and being yourself is essential.

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Avoid rambling and remain focused

For some, answering this question is like pulling teeth. For others, it's fun getting to share and share and share some more! It's best to find a happy medium.  Consider ahead of time the highlights you'd like to cover when sharing about yourself and stay focused on those highlights during the interview. It's good to provide your ”Tell 

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Avoid rambling and remain focused

me about yourself” answer in under a minute or two — only go longer if the interviewer has asked follow-up questions based on what you've shared.

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Practice ahead of time

This point is the most common tip you'll receive, but it's still worth reiterating. Practicing and jotting down notes on what you plan to share with the interviewer is a great way to be more prepared during your interview, and, as a result, more at ease and relaxed. It's helpful to practice out loud with someone you trust. Beware of sounding too rehearsed when you're in the interview room, though.

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