7 HR Trends You’ll Wish You Read Before 2023

7 HR Trends You’ll Wish You Read Before 2023

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HR to start listening more (or at least show it is)

In short The latest research revealed that employees don’t think HR is taking their feedback on board. How can HR respond? Communicate how feedback will be used as it’s collected and demonstrate how it’s being used to drive change. It seems so obvious, but this answers the audience’s question of 

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HR to start listening more (or at least show it is)

what’s in it for me? Why should they bother taking the time and energy to respond!? Two statistics emphasise why those two steps above are so important: – 38% felt the company was rarely or never open to their ideas = there are flaws in how feedback is collected. – 70% of staff said they had little or no influence over how 

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HR to start listening more (or at least show it is)

things were done at their company = the way feedback is actioned or how that is communicated doesn’t make it clear where employee responses have driven real change.

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Performance management to actually be about performance and development in 2023

In short 65% of HR Directors told Clear Review that their performance management process had been put on the back burner over this last year, while people development was at a three-year low as a key HR focus. How can HR respond? Improve the quality of conversations around performance, and it’s pretty 

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Performance management to actually be about performance and development in 2023

much as simple as that. It’s quite ironic that most people are naming productivity and engagement as the focus of their performance management efforts and not performance! HR can’t sit in on every conversation, but it can act as a facilitator of better interactions between managers and employees – which , it turns out, is pretty critical right now.

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Finally settling on flexible working arrangements that work for everyone

In short More and more employees are working in hybrid settings, but there’s still an inconsistency in their working and learning experiences. How can HR respond? Consistency will be your best friend! If you’re offering that in the ways people work, learn and engage, you’ll close those gaps above. 

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Finally settling on flexible working arrangements that work for everyone

One of the best examples is social learning. Why should someone in-person get more access to your internal experts than a remote employee, or why would the latter get a watered-down version of a face-to-face experience?  Let’s say 40% of your marketing team work remotely. You decide to hold an in-person session on the new brand, they can’t attend, but no worries, we’ll send them the recording after.

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Finally settling on flexible working arrangements that work for everyone

Actually, yes worries! Because not only will they miss the opportunity to participate or ask questions, they’ll have to watch others doing it. They are literally seeing what they could have won. The better option would be to deliver it in a live virtual classroom, allowing everyone to participate on their own terms. Better yet, you decide 

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Finally settling on flexible working arrangements that work for everyone

you’ll add some contextual resources before the session and attach the new brand guidelines after. All you need is a place to do it all.

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A reassessment of the company culture’s role and importance

In short What a difference three years make! In January 2020, employees were ten times more likely to stay at a company for friendships than pay rises.  Now, HR has to contend with the fact that socialising has slipped down the pecking order, and people feel less connected to culture.

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A reassessment of the company culture’s role and importance

How can HR respond? Speak to people and get some honest answers! You might need to anonymise the feedback channel, but you’ll never get the culture right if you don’t know what people want from it. We spoke about it from an L&D perspective on an episode of our L&D Disrupt podcast, but when you’re solving the wrong 

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A reassessment of the company culture’s role and importance

problem, you get everything that follows wrong. Let’s say you receive the news that remote employees don’t feel connected to their peers. So you start funding their travel into the office once a month to offer face-to-face time. Nice gesture, but what if your remote employees were never bothered about meeting in person… In fact, their issue was that it 

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A reassessment of the company culture’s role and importance

never felt like they were working on meaningful projects together. It wasn’t a social issue but a working relationship one. If you assume the problem or define it poorly, you end up taking actions that never address the root cause. So, speak to people about culture, and don’t do anything else until you have.

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Onboarding to finally get itself together (and an end to job description catfishing)

In short Onboarding’s been in a chaotic state of flux for a few years now, and it’s showing!  2022 research shows that A LOT of employees really haven’t been enjoying their onboarding experiences, so it’s time for that to change. And part of it might be due to misleading job descriptions…

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Onboarding to finally get itself together (and an end to job description catfishing)

How can HR respond? Obviously, there’s a lot to unpack here. The most straightforward place to start would be with a review of your job descriptions, given that they’re often the first domino in the chain.  Are they reflective of the role and the performance you’re expecting of the people who fill them? Could they do with a 

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Onboarding to finally get itself together (and an end to job description catfishing)

less-is-more clean up? For the other issues, we’ve actually got the perfect blog post on overcoming modern onboarding challenges!  But to summarise some quick actions for you here: Build a personalised onboarding plan with goals based around getting people to productivity and able to perform the role – it’s helpful 

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Onboarding to finally get itself together (and an end to job description catfishing)

if you stagger those. For example, a new sales rep’s first milestone might be pitching the product internally before moving to simulated prospect calls and then the real thing under supervision. When you have that in place, you can connect them to people in meaningful ways to prevent them from feeling isolated. An experienced sales 

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Onboarding to finally get itself together (and an end to job description catfishing)

rep could coach them through pitching, before a manager practices those calls with them – which is probably far more helpful than small talk. Lastly, it might be time for an honest assessment of your tech stack. 68% of business leaders believe new software has a high learning curve, and there’s a fair chance a lot of your software will be new to 

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Onboarding to finally get itself together (and an end to job description catfishing)

new employees. Add to that the issue of 91% feeling frustrated by work tech generally and 57% by legacy tech, and it could be time for a freshen up.

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Wellbeing being more than a webinar or week of support

In short Burnout, stress and a poor work-life balance are still very much real concerns for employees. And sadly, quick fixes and token efforts like webinars still seem to be the most used tool in the box. How can HR respond? Get to the root cause of the problem! Why are your people feeling stressed, burned out, 

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Wellbeing being more than a webinar or week of support

or unsupported. It could be financial pressure, with 59% of respondents stating they were stressed by their monetary situation. Maybe it’s that working remotely is making mental health conversations harder – a concern flagged by close to half of the survey participants. Or it could just be that they’re uncomfortable discussing the topic at work, a statement that 46% agreed with.

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Wellbeing being more than a webinar or week of support

Given all of the above, you need to carefully consider how you collect the feedback that helps you tackle the problem. These are sensitive subjects, so consider how you anonymise feedback to remove those fears and pressures.  At the same time, you have to ensure there’s consistency between remote and in-person employees – given that 

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Wellbeing being more than a webinar or week of support

almost half feel working outside the office is a barrier to important conversations.

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