7 Company Culture Trends to Watch in 2022

7 Company Culture Trends to Watch in 2022

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1. Prioritizing Employee Mental and Emotional Health

In response to the rise in occupational stress over the last couple years, 76% of employers with 500 or more employees said addressing employee mental and emotional health will be a “top priority over the next 3-5 years,” according to Mercer’s 2021 National Survey of Employer-Sponsored Health Plans.

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1. Prioritizing Employee Mental and Emotional Health

Consider this cultural trend when communicating with your workforce and when designing your benefits package.  This could include a more flexible PTO policy, offering an EAP, or even pet-friendly benefits.

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2. Increasingly Remote and Hybrid Workplaces

As a result of the COVID pandemic, workplaces were forced to reconsider the very concept of a “workplace.”  A recent Gallup analysis predicted that—“when the pandemic wanes and something close to ‘normal’ returns”—there will be 37% fewer workers reporting full-time in the physical office. Many companies are adjusting 

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2. Increasingly Remote and Hybrid Workplaces

to and preparing for this trend by creating new HR roles, such as Head of Remote.  For organizations not prepared for a fully remote workforce, HR and employers might consider a hybrid model or more flexible work hours, especially to stay competitive during the retention tension of the so-called “Great Resignation.”

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3. Emphasis on Personalized Performance Management

As workforces become more decentralized and worker-focused, employee performance conversations can have a huge influence on how satisfied, motivated, and productive employees are. To address that need, HR should consider implementing weekly 1:1 meetings, in which managers can offer constructive coaching. HR and 

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3. Emphasis on Personalized Performance Management

managers can also rely on regular 1:1 documentation to cover compliance concerns in the event an employee is laid off or terminated.

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4. More Workplace Transparency

According to a 2021 report, 58% of surveyed workers said they would consider moving to another organization for more pay transparency. Why?  When HR and employers demonstrate a commitment to workplace transparency—including in compensation practices—it’s actually their employees who feel seen. It fosters the kind of mutual 

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4. More Workplace Transparency

respect necessary for a healthy company culture. Workplace transparency involves clear and frequent communication between employees and management.  It also means sharing information and expectations—regarding company decisions, compensation, and performance—across teams as well as up and down the organizational chart.

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5. Focus on Employee Feedback

Recent McKinsey research found that 54% of workers who resigned from a job in the last six months cited not feeling valued by their companies as a contributing factor.  More and more, HR and employers are recognizing their need to know about these potential retention problems before employees quit.

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5. Focus on Employee Feedback

Regular surveys are the best way to keep a finger on the pulse of employee satisfaction. Surveys are not only good predictors of employee behavior; they’re also an excellent way to influence it.  In other words, surveys can help you better understand employee satisfaction while building your company culture at the same time.

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6. Need for Upskilling and Reskilling

The World Economic Forum anticipates that, by 2025, about half of the global workforce will require upskilling or reskilling—learning new skills to perform better at a current job or a different job, respectively—in order to adapt to technological innovation. The need for upskilling and reskilling seems obvious, but how can it improve company 

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6. Need for Upskilling and Reskilling

culture? First, companies with a healthy culture show employees respect by investing in their futures through training and continuing education.  Second, in organizations with transparent compensation practices, upskilling and reskilling empower employees to seek raises and promotions by providing a clear path upward.

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7. Reliance on Digital Processes

Automation and other technological innovations are opportunities, not threats.  For example, an all-in-one human resources information system can streamline HR processes, saving time and decreasing error. 

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