5 Workplace Trends and Predictions for 2022, According to Experts

Learn more

Arrow

Next page

Arrow

1. The aftermath of the Great Resignation

By now, you've likely heard about The Great Resignation and the 4.5 million Americans who voluntarily left their jobs in November of 2021.  Whether or not another big quitting wave comes in 2022, the effects of these record-high resignations aren't going away anytime soon.  As Anthony Klotz, the 

White Scribbled Underline

Next page

Arrow

1. The aftermath of the Great Resignation

psychologist and Texas A&M University professor who coined the phrase "The Great Resignation," told CNBC, "This is a moment of empowerment for workers, one that will continue well into the new year."  While The Great Resignation is leaving some workplaces short-staffed and struggling to find workers, there's also a positive 

White Scribbled Underline

Next page

Arrow

1. The aftermath of the Great Resignation

consequence: It's pushing companies to offer better benefits and higher salaries.

White Scribbled Underline

Next page

Arrow

2. More demands for flexibility

As workers become more empowered to make demands for better work conditions, flexibility to work from anywhere is at the top of the list.  Several studies have shown that half of American workers rank flexibility as more important than higher pay.  While the push for more remote 

White Scribbled Underline

Next page

Arrow

2. More demands for flexibility

work and work-from-home flexibility has been happening for a while, it's become even more clear to workers that flexible work options are out there if they don't already have them.

White Scribbled Underline

Next page

Arrow

3. No more work "families"

This idea of work families can increasingly blur the line between professional and personal lives, making it even harder for workers to establish a healthy work-life balance.  This framing can also create toxic expectations of loyalty, in which employees are expected to pour everything into their jobs, just as they might do anything for family.

White Scribbled Underline

Next page

Arrow

3. No more work "families"

With the trend of increased workers' enlightenment, more and more people are seeking out jobs that are just that—jobs, which they can clock out or log off from and separate from their personal lives.

White Scribbled Underline

Next page

Arrow

4. Employee coaching

One way to make employees feel seen, Zimmerman says, is to invest in their individual success and growth.  At her own company, Zimmerman recently hired an employee coach, whose role is to help employees with their skill development and performance at work.  While employee coaching is a 

White Scribbled Underline

Next page

Arrow

4. Employee coaching

slower growing trend, Zimmerman believes the investment in this extra layer of engaging with employees has great potential to payoff if more companies follow suit.

White Scribbled Underline

Next page

Arrow

5. Four-day workweeks

The four-day workweek is in no way a new idea, but it's taken this wide-scale reevaluation of the workplace to make it finally feel (somewhat) within reach.  Several companies, like The Financial Diet, Kickstarter, Healthwise, and more have already implemented and seen success from adopting the three-day weekend formula. 

White Scribbled Underline

Next page

Arrow

5. Four-day workweeks

So, while we're likely a ways away from four-day workweeks becoming the norm, keep an eye out for more companies following the trend this year as we reimagine what the work week looks like.

White Scribbled Underline

More

Read

10 New Job Fields for Women in 2022

10 Steps to a Resume That Will Get You Hired

10 Important Career Tips for Women

See More