5 Remote Job Skills You Already Have

5 Remote Job Skills You Already Have

Learn more

Arrow

Next page

Arrow

1. Communication Skills

Hiring managers are always looking for candidates with good communication skills, both written and verbal.  However, when you’re applying for a remote job, it’s more important than ever to be able to demonstrate that you can communicate well with coworkers, managers, clients, and vendors—even when you’re not in the same physical location.

White Scribbled Underline

Next page

Arrow

1. Communication Skills

Listening skills are the foundation of successful communication. If you can’t pay attention to what others are saying or indicate your respect for them while clarifying their intent, you can’t find common ground.  Practice active listening techniques to improve your listening skills. Interviews are a prime 

White Scribbled Underline

Next page

Arrow

1. Communication Skills

opportunity to showcase your verbal communication skills.  Again, listening is essential, but so is preparing for the interview. Research the company, practice interviewing techniques and be ready to answer common interview questions—there may be some about communicating when working remotely.

White Scribbled Underline

Next page

Arrow

2. Self-Motivation

To succeed as a remote worker, you need to be self-motivated. While some employers monitor their distributed workforce more than others, every employer wants to see that their workers can hit their goals without micromanagement. If you’re not feeling driven to show initiative in your work, the first question to ask is, “Do I need a new job?”

White Scribbled Underline

Next page

Arrow

2. Self-Motivation

If your job isn’t the problem, you may need some new habits. Try setting small goals, working in short bursts, or tackling tasks in batches. Many interviewers will ask the question, “Are you self-motivated?” The answer should be a resounding “Yes”—but don’t stop there. Be prepared to offer specific examples of how you keep yourself motivated.

White Scribbled Underline

Next page

Arrow

3. A Willingness to Ask for Help

Asking for help can be challenging in any work environment.  When you work remotely, it can be even more difficult to swallow your pride and admit that you need clarification, assistance or a second set of eyes on a problem. On the other hand, if you’re good at recognizing that you need a hand, you’ll have a massive 

White Scribbled Underline

Next page

Arrow

3. A Willingness to Ask for Help

advantage over those who difficulty reaching out for help. If you find it awkward to reach out for assistance, start by lending others a hand. Not only will this build morale and improve your relationships with your coworkers, but it will buy you some goodwill.

White Scribbled Underline

Next page

Arrow

4. Teamwork and Collaboration

Being able to get along with others and cooperate to achieve a goal is essential in any job. But when you’re working remotely, it’s even more important to prioritize collaboration and communication among teammates. In practice, this means being proactive about reaching out to your colleagues. If you’re a 

White Scribbled Underline

Next page

Arrow

4. Teamwork and Collaboration

manager, setting and keeping regular one-on-one meetings should be part of your approach. If you’re an individual contributor, it’s important to understand how your manager and colleagues communicate best. The easiest way to do this is to reach out and ask your team-mates, “What works best for you—Slack, email, or 

White Scribbled Underline

Next page

Arrow

4. Teamwork and Collaboration

Zoom?” It’s also essential to respect other points of view during your communications with teammates.  You’re not going to agree on every issue, and that’s for the best: hearing multiple opinions and perspectives will allow your team to find the most effective solutions. The best teams are the ones that expect and manage conflict.

White Scribbled Underline

Next page

Arrow

5. Problem-Solving Skills

Problem-solving skills apply to more jobs than any other soft skill. Managers want candidates who can identify, analyze, and address problems in positions ranging from customer service to executive management. But even if your position doesn’t seem to involve a great deal of problem-solving, you’ll need these skills when you work from home.

White Scribbled Underline

Next page

Arrow

5. Problem-Solving Skills

Remote jobs are complex simply because you’re off-site and away from the rest of your team. You may have to deal with issues that would not arise if you were in the office. For example, if you have a computer problem at the office, you can probably walk your laptop over to tech support. When you work from home, 

White Scribbled Underline

Next page

Arrow

5. Problem-Solving Skills

you'll have to be able to address the issue remotely, speaking to your IT folks via phone or video chat. If you gather the correct information, analyze it effectively, and make a plan to put it into action you’ll maximize your chances of coming up with a good solution. If that sounds obvious, consider how many 

White Scribbled Underline

Next page

Arrow

5. Problem-Solving Skills

times you’ve seen a colleague "go with their gut" during a crisis, with less-than-successful results.  You’ve also probably seen plenty of coworkers think up a good solution and then fail to put it into action.

White Scribbled Underline

More

Read

10 New Job Fields for Women in 2022

10 Steps to a Resume That Will Get You Hired

10 Important Career Tips for Women

See More