12 Questions To Ask on Your First Day of Work

12 Questions To Ask on Your First Day of Work

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1. What are the expectations for my position in the first 90 days?

Find out how soon they want you to be proficient in company processes and systems and what their performance expectations are for your role. Asking this question lets your employer know you intend to do your best to meet their needs during your introductory period. It also helps you know what goals you should be working toward as you start your new job.

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2. When will I have evaluations and informal check-ins?

This question can help you understand the company's evaluation and feedback processes. It's good to know right away how often you will have a formal review so you can be prepared to meet goals and expectations.  By asking about more informal performance reviews, you can learn ways to gauge how well you're doing or if you have 

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2. When will I have evaluations and informal check-ins?

areas that need improvement before your formal evaluation.

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3. How can I share my ideas?

Asking this question shows your new employer that you are self-motivated and ready to contribute to the workplace. You can prove that you were the right choice and a valuable asset to the company by preparing to bring innovations to the team.  As a new employee, you have a fresh look at the way the company operates. However, it 

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3. How can I share my ideas?

can be challenging to know where and how you should share this information.  Asking a hiring manager or team leader right away can help guide your future input as a team member.

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4. Can you tell me about the company vision?

Before you ask this question, it's also a good idea to read this information from the company website and any handbook materials you've received to make sure you do know what the company stands for.  By asking a manager or coworker directly, you can learn how the company's written words translate to actual workplace functions and 

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4. Can you tell me about the company vision?

culture. Then you can begin to form an understanding of how your role fits into that vision.

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5. What are my main objectives for week one?

When you start a new position, it may take some time before you can create a normal work routine. It's a good idea to know what your employer expects you to accomplish right when you begin.  You may be trained for the first few weeks or you may be expected to just get started and learn as you go. If there are moments when no one 

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5. What are my main objectives for week one?

specifically gives you a task, you can refer back to what you were told on day one when you asked this question.

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6. Who will I be reporting to?

Companies often post an organizational chart in their employee handbook, but you may still need some clarity once you're officially hired.  Even if you see a direct manager on a chart, it's a good idea to ask since businesses often reorganize internal structures and hierarchies. If your direct manager isn't the one hiring you, ask to be 

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6. Who will I be reporting to?

introduced to the person you'll be reporting to. That way you have a chance to start your professional relationship with positive interaction and a face-to-face greeting.

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7. What tools do you use to get your work done?

Many jobs require you to use several software systems or applications. Your position might even utilize physical tools or machinery.  When you're introduced to these tools from the beginning, you can take notes and ask more questions while you have someone to demonstrate using the tool. After the first day, it 

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7. What tools do you use to get your work done?

may be harder to find time to get step-by-step assistance.

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8. What should I consider essential daily tasks?

It's easier to begin doing your best when you have a clear idea of your position. Even though you've been hired for a specific job, it may not be clear what your daily tasks should be.  The sooner you ask, the more productive you can be. You can begin to have a better understanding of what management sees as your role by asking this question.

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9. How do people prefer to communicate at the office?

Every office has a communication style. By asking this question, you find out exactly how your coworkers and management interact.  Some companies prefer a more informal messaging system or group chat, while others use email or inter-office phone lines to stay connected. Also, find out how comfortable people are visiting another office or 

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9. How do people prefer to communicate at the office?

common area to speak in person and how comfortable your direct manager is with employees knocking on their office door for a chat.

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10. What are your metrics for measuring success?

It's important to know how your new company quantifies success in the workplace to ensure you measure your achievements, productivity and efficiency the same way others do.  They may use a rating system or a performance feedback tool if your job is project-based. You can ask the hiring manager or your trainer what they consider 

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10. What are your metrics for measuring success?

to be key performance indicators (KPIs) for your position. Once you have an understanding of your expected KPIs, you can complete work assignments and tasks using these indicators as a specific goal.

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11. How often do you want me to give you updates?

This question helps you understand how much your direct manager wants you to communicate about your work.  Some managers prefer a more open communication style, while others use formal feedback sessions or reviews. It's a good idea to know from the beginning how often you need to check in so you can be prepared to explain your 

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11. How often do you want me to give you updates?

progress or share information about your job performance when necessary.

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12. What are the expectations for work hours?

If it's not clear in your hiring documents, you may need to ask about working hour policies.  You can ask what time you're expected to start work and how much time you have for lunch and breaks. This question can also help you discover the flexibility of start times and ending hours. Your new company may also have 

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12. What are the expectations for work hours?

specific guidelines about working late or on weekends.

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